Tag Archives: DISNEY

The Stories Behind Aulani, a Disney Resort and Spa

Today marks the fifth anniversary of the morning I stood on the balcony of the Maka’ala and saw a glorious rainbow emerge above Waikolohe Valley. In Hawaiian, rainbows suggest transformation and that’s certainly an accurate word to describe my experience here.

The first guests were welcomed to Aulani, a Disney Resort and Spa, located in Ko Olina on the island of O’ahu five years ago today. In that time, the resort has quickly become one of the most popular family vacation destinations in the world. What happens when Disney, a company of storytellers, comes to Hawaii, which is full of storytellers?

Magic. That’s what happens.

So, while much has been written in the travel press about the resort and it’s amenities, I want to give you an artists look at Aulani, and share some of the ideas and concepts behind it. In other words, it’s time to “talk story”…

Ahupua’a

Ahupua'a
Ahupua’a

Central to Aulani was the concept of “ahupua’a“, a complex system of land division dating back to when the islands were ruled by chiefs. An island would have multiple ahupua’a – wedge shaped plots of land that stretched from the mountains to the sea. Within each ahupua’a were most of the necessities to sustain a community – water from mountain streams, koa and other trees in the upslopes for building structures and canoes, farmland in the valley for animals and crops of taro, the lowland and beaches for living, and the sea for fishing. Whatever could not be found in one ahupua’a might be traded for something of value from another; enabling trade and commerce. While this certainly seems a practical approach, it’s actually rooted in Hawaiian spirituality. The Hawaiians believed in the interrelationship of humans and the elements. The ahupua’a infused all of the elements of nature into the activities of daily and seasonal life. Not only were all of the elements necessary and important but so was each person and their contribution to the community. You hunted, or built, or gathered, or cooked, or fished. Each person had value. Each contribution to the community had value.

Waianae Tower
Waianae Tower

If you look at Aulani, you’ll see that the hotel towers begin far from the beach. They represent the mountains, and just like the mountains, decrease in height as they approach the water. Large timber elements grace the facades of the towers, representing trees in the upper reaches of the mountains.

Waikolohe Stream
Waikolohe Stream

In the Waikolohe Valley below, multiple sources of water meander through areas thick with lush, overgrown foliage; spanned by “old” bridges. Dark-colored textures and stones appear within this area of the valley.

As you get closer to the beach, the landscaping thins and the stonework becomes more arid, similar to the Ewa plain upon which the resort is built; and as you get closer the beach, small structures begin to appear as they would have in the lowlands of old Hawaii.

DUALITY

Another element underlying Aulani is that of gender duality; acknowledging that everything has a masculine and a feminine side. This is expressed primarily in two areas. First, on either side of the Maka’ala as you enter through the front doors of the resort, there appear two streams. The one on the left (the Ewa side) is tranquil and calm (feminine). The one on the right (the Waianae side) is lively and boisterous (masculine). Further representation of this concept can be found on the towers themselves. The Ewa tower features rounder, softer graphic elements. The Waianae tower’s graphic elements are sharper.

Waianae Tower Detail
Waianae Tower Detail

Additionally, the sides of each tower capture, in magnificently oversized bas relief, key Hawaiian legends

Maui Bas Relief
Maui Bas Relief

LOOK TWICE

Aulani is suffused with the Hawaiian concept of “look twice, see three times”. This is perhaps most evident in Pu’u Kilo. At first glance it appears to be a caldera. Upon closer inspection, there appear to be discernible shapes. An even closer look reveals silhouettes of island animals carved into the face of the caldera.

Do you see the whale?
Do you see the whale?

A HALE (or home) FOR ART

Guests are welcomed to Aulani through Maka’ala. Maka’ala is distinguished on the exterior by three large arches, echoing the inverted hull of a canoe (which is how the first polynesian settlers arrived). The interior of the lobby features a wraparound mural telling the story of the islands, from its pre-contact days through the present. The mural, along with the rest of the art on the property, was created by Hawaiian artists. The resort houses the single largest collection of original Hawaiian art (outside of a museum) in the world.

Maka'ala
Maka’ala

SMALL TOUCHES

Hundreds of details abound across the property. Instead of tiki torches, the resort has custom designed torches inspired by one of the Hawaiians first sources of artificial light – the Kukui nut. At the entrance, you aren’t greeted by tiki figures (tiki is not Hawaiian) but by Hawaiian Ki’i figures). The guest room carpet features sculpted Taro leaves, one of Hawaii’s original food sources. Everywhere you look, graphics and design elements rooted in Hawaiian history tell a story.

Kukui Nut-inspired fixtures
Kukui Nut-inspired fixtures

CULTURAL SENSITIVITY

None of this would have happened without a concerted effort and outreach to local leaders, artisans, elders, Auntys, and Hawaiian historians and scholars. They shared their history, their knowledge, their stories, and their hearts with the Imagineers who were tasked with designing and building Aulani. That desire to honor Hawaii and its people is abundantly clear; and the resort delivers on its original intent which was to be authentically Hawaiian, yet distinctly Disney.

!nsp!re – Creativity, Inc by Pixar’s Ed Catmull

Creativity, Inc by Ed Catmull
Creativity, Inc by Ed Catmull

I recently had the opportunity attend a Live Talk in downtown Los Angeles featuring Ed Catmull from Pixar Animation Studios. Ed has been promoting his new book, “Creativity, Inc”, and this talk was part of that promotional effort.

Ed Catmull participating in a Live Talk in downtown LA.
Ed Catmull participating in a Live Talk in downtown LA.

The talk lasted for an hour or so, with a host and Ed seated in front of a crowd of 100 or so attendees. Those in attendance were a wide variety of individuals; the full range of age, ethnicity, and experience, which was quite nice to see. During the talk, he related  a number of tales from the book and discussed how he came to believe what he believes. He discussed the success of implementing his ideas at Pixar, then expressing his concern at scaling them up to work at Disney; only to see them flourish in that environment as well.

Over the next few days, I finished the book. Upon thumbing back through it, I realized I had dog-eared more places in this book than many of the books I’ve read over the last few years. I’ve gone back to it a few times since to look up specific passages.

In some ways, it’s hard to remember that just 19 years ago, Pixar was a scrappy animation house fighting to make and release the first computer-animated feature film. The book holds numerous tales of that time period; when Ed, John Lasseter, and Steve Jobs were trying to figure out how to actually do what they wanted to do IN THE WAY they wanted to do it. Just convincing people it could be done was a Herculean task which Ed had been trying to pull off for years (which seems amazing now, given how far the industry has come in the last two decades).

In the beginning, the three heads had somewhat morphing responsibilities but ultimately; John was the story guy, Steve was the deal guy, and Ed ended up being the people guy.

He relates this in Chapter 4, “So for the next couple of years I made a habit, when giving talks, of posing the question to my audience: Which is more valuable, good ideas or good people? No matter whether I was talking to retired business executives or students, when I asked for a show of hands, the audiences would be split 50-50…To me the answer should be obvious: Ideas come from people. Therefore, people are more important than ideas…It is the focus on people – their work habits, their talents, their values – that is absolutely central to any creative venture”

He goes on to talk about many facets of running a creative business; communication structure, rules, limits, perfection, stability vs balance, trust, “craft without art” and many others. One of the most fascinating is the concept of the “braintrust”. This is a group of creatives that meet with the director of the current film to exchange views on how to solve problems. The braintrust is expected to deliver candor, which is tough to do. No one really wants to tell a  director that his ending sucks; but if that’s the truth, someone needs to say it – and it’s this group of passionate, committed, artistic peers that does it. Another key element of the braintrust is that the director is required to hear and consider all of the feedback but is under NO obligation to act on it, if he chooses – BRILLIANT!

I think we could all implement our own version of a braintrust. I know I have mine – a small, select group of peers who aren’t afraid to be honest and lay it on the line – because we’ve established that the only consequences for honesty are a better product, or a better show, or a better photo; not retribution or petty grievance.

“Creativity, Inc” is a fascinating read for a number of different types of people; whether you’re a Disney-Pixar fan, a business leader,  a student, or a creative type, you’re bound to find numerous ideas and concepts here that resonate with you. I recommend it highly.

!nsp!re – PAPERMAN, A Groundbreaking New Animation Technique

Take a look at the full animated short feature, “PAPERMAN”, created by Walt Disney Animation Studios. This short introduces a creative new animation technique that merges hand-drawn animation with CGI. The short, from first-time director John Kahrs, is nominated for an Oscar this year. Clicking on the picture below will open a new window and take you to youtube where you can view the short in it’s entirety.

"PAPERMAN"

PAPERMAN